Deborah Kass

This exhibition of neon works and large-scale paintings on canvas is Deborah Kass’ second with the gallery. Drawing from contemporary society, Broadway musicals, Yiddish and prominent art figures, she continues to incorporate lyrics and vernacular, melding art history and pop culture in vibrant, resonating compositions reminiscent of Frank Stella and Ellsworth Kelly. The work is depictive of the current posture of popular and political culture and the ensuing dysphoria, especially in contrast to the optimism of the postwar era. Read More

Gordon Parks

“Segregation Story” includes never-before-published images originally part of a series photographed for a 1956 Life magazine photo-essay assignment, “The Restraints: Open and Hidden,” which documented everyday lives of an extended black family living in the rural South under Jim Crow segregation. This compelling series challenged the myth of racism, demonstrating that the ambitions, responsibilities and routines of this family were no different than those of white Americans. All photographs © The Gordon Parks Foundation. Read More

Amy Weiskopf

Still Lifes is Amy Weiskopf’s first exhibition with the gallery and includes approximately twenty small- to medium-scale recent works in oil. The carefully organized and composed paintings are unquestionably elegant and visually alluring. Read More

James Drake

Can We Know the Sound of Forgiveness, artist James Drake’s eleventh exhibition with the gallery, features a collection of the artist’s “red” drawings as well as a grouping of glass sculpture. The pastel drawings continue to reveal the renowned artist’s method and deliberation. The subjects, always personal, are often flecked with faint notations and markings, on paper consumed by the process, sometimes pieced together with exposed tape. Read More

David Halliday

David Halliday’s photographic series, Threadbare, profoundly builds on his previous work, at once announcing the photographer’s maturity as an artist. Provocative iconography of lost Americana - heavily decayed objects whose original intention has been exhausted - is given a new sort of vitality as his subject matter. Read More

John Hartman

John Hartman, one of Canada’s most renowned contemporary painters, conceives of cities not as man-made anomalies but rather as provocative landscapes. With a unique and vibrant color palette, astral-like perspective and obvious deference, he captures the essence and lifeblood of the chosen terrain. New Orleans From Above presents aerial views of the city and surrounding areas through the artist’s distinct voice. The compositions include New Orleans from above Algiers, the CBD and Mississippi; as well as Bayou Lafourche, Delacroix, Port Fourchon, Yscloskey and Shell Beach. The exhibition is comprised of large- and small-scale oil paintings on linen and birch panel, as well as watercolor on paper. Read More

Bruce Davenport, Jr.

Bruce Davenport, Jr.’s vivid color marker drawings provide detailed reenactments – the bands in precise number and formation and the multitude of spectators surrounding them. The small- and large-scale works on paper are flecked with the artist’s thoughts and tributes, interspersed between the crowds and streets. The rendered still moments evoke the energy and ceremony of the entire procession. The artist has been described as, “not so much a self-taught artist as he is a self-taught anthropologist.” Read More

George Dureau

George Dureau, a native New Orleanian, has been exhibiting paintings and charcoal drawings since the 1960s. In a style self-described as “Classical Romantic”, he has always demonstrated a singular ability to render the beauty of the human figure in intricate compositions often inspired by allegorical scenes from great paintings and sculpture in Western art. Dureau has stated that, “after drawing and composing with much control and clear intention” he would then proceed “to paint with passion and often abandon.” Read More

Robert Gordy

Robert Gordy is considered one of the most original and creative Southern painters of the twentieth century. His unfortunate death from AIDS in 1986 at the age of 52 was an enormous loss. The paintings in this exhibition, on both canvas and paper, date from between 1954 and 1981. Many of the works contain the artist's clean-edged and stylized forms, melodic patterns and flawless color harmonies so characteristic of his work prior to 1982. Read More