Exhibitions

Edward Burtynsky

Intentional Landscapes is world-renowned Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky’s second exhibition with the gallery. Burtynsky has spent his career traveling the world documenting waterfronts, farmlands, irrigation plots, rivers and various water maintenance systems – focusing mainly on landscapes where industry has transformed nature. The resulting images are meant as metaphors to the dilemma of our modern existence. Burtynsky states, “Our dependence on nature to provide the materials for our consumption and our concern for the health of our planet sets us into an uneasy contradiction.” Read More

Jonathan Mayers

L'Éparpillage is Jonathan “feral opossum” Mayers’ first exhibition with the gallery. Recent, small- to medium-scale, vibrant paintings depict metaphorical beasts amid meticulously rendered Louisiana landscapes. The mysterious creatures – somewhat wicked, somewhat charming – were born of the artist’s familiarity with Louisiana folklore, and serve to illustrate his opinion pertaining to the reality we live in. The haunting, curious images also address the current fragility of our ecosystem, most specifically the southern region of Louisiana. Read More

Read More and Eli Hansen

Read More and Eli Hansen are childhood friends who have been collaborating for decades. Just out of high school, they would fill up their trucks with various items and head to an isolated spot outside of town. Alone for the weekend, they’d construct a playground of “junk,” complete with lights and stereos. A few days later they’d clean everything up, erasing any trace of their outpost. Over the years, they’ve reconnected to recreate these weekends and this exhibition is the latest installment. The wrong way home. objectifies experimentation and investigation while juxtaposing inertia with action. Read More

rob wynne

Rob Wynne

The works in Rob Wynne’s second exhibition with the gallery reference the ability to grasp visual stimuli without consciously perceiving them. References to sleight of hand and magic are made tangible by the artist as he addresses issues of perception and the concept of seeing. His long-standing fascination with narrative is evident in the beautiful, transportive, and sometimes camp landscapes he creates for language. Read More

Tim Hailand

Sister I'm a Poet marks Tim Hailand's first solo exhibition with the gallery. The small- to large-scale photographic portraits in the exhibition are a continuation of a body of work developed during a 2012 residency in Giverny where Hailand found inspiration in the Toile de Jouy wallpaper. Drawing upon this inspiration, as well as his training as a painter, Hailand began creating dreamlike compositions by printing his photographic images directly on patterned fabrics. Read More

Vernon Fisher

Distant Voices in a Foreign Language is Vernon Fisher’s first exhibition with the gallery and features multiple bodies of work from the past decade. Patricia Mora describes the artist’s work as “rigorous, yet thoroughly fun-infused, excursions that are analogous to solving for ‘x.’” Read More

Amy Feldman

Amy Feldman creates seemingly simple, large-scale gray abstractions notable for their visual impact and droll sense of humor. She explores how images and signs are perceived and distilled, and then draws attention to humanness in her work through its iconic language and subtle variation. Read More

John Hartman

City Portraits – New Orleans presents paintings of aerial views of the city and the surrounding parishes. The small- to large-scale works on panel and linen reflect the artist’s unique and vibrant color palette, and reveal his enduring esteem for the city and her contours. Unique to this new body of work is the addition of incorporated portraits of revered local musicians. Read More

Jacqueline Bishop

This exhibition includes small- to large-scale oil paintings on panel and linen, as well as medium-scale collages with watercolor on paper which reveal the artist's continued exploration of landscape painting and the complex connections between climate change, species extinction and migration. Read More

David Leventi

In his second exhibition with the gallery, photographer David Leventi presents his images of the interiors of world-famous opera houses juxtaposed with images of the interiors of the last remaining domed prisons. Together, they are a study in contrasts – the lavish social theaters versus stark dwellings of incarceration and deprivation. Astonishingly, the architectural similarities between the two venues momentarily obscure fundamental differences in their operations. One such difference is that of observation – the audience of many observing a few versus the few observing the many. The large-scale, painting-like prints allow the viewer the experience and emotion of being surrounded by the various spaces. The artist employs large-format Arca-Swiss cameras to ensure that his compositions are architecturally symmetrical and emphasize Euclidean geometry. Read More