Exhibitions

Read More and Eli Hansen

Read More and Eli Hansen are childhood friends who have been collaborating for decades. Just out of high school, they would fill up their trucks with various items and head to an isolated spot outside of town. Alone for the weekend, they’d construct a playground of “junk,” complete with lights and stereos. A few days later they’d clean everything up, erasing any trace of their outpost. Over the years, they’ve reconnected to recreate these weekends and this exhibition is the latest installment. The wrong way home. objectifies experimentation and investigation while juxtaposing inertia with action. Read More

rob wynne

Rob Wynne

The works in Rob Wynne’s second exhibition with the gallery reference the ability to grasp visual stimuli without consciously perceiving them. References to sleight of hand and magic are made tangible by the artist as he addresses issues of perception and the concept of seeing. His long-standing fascination with narrative is evident in the beautiful, transportive, and sometimes camp landscapes he creates for language. Read More

Tim Hailand

Sister I'm a Poet marks Tim Hailand's first solo exhibition with the gallery. The small- to large-scale photographic portraits in the exhibition are a continuation of a body of work developed during a 2012 residency in Giverny where Hailand found inspiration in the Toile de Jouy wallpaper. Drawing upon this inspiration, as well as his training as a painter, Hailand began creating dreamlike compositions by printing his photographic images directly on patterned fabrics. Read More

Bunny Matthews

Before and After features Bunny Matthews’ iconic, instantly recognizable cartoons spanning the last 34 years. Meticulously rendered in pen and ink and sometimes colored pencil, the cartoons are drawn in what art critic Eric Bookhardt noted as Matthews’ "traditional post-psychedelic baroque caricature style." In 1982, Bunny Matthews created the emblematic characters, Vic and Nat’ly Broussard for the Times-Picayune’s Dixie magazine. For decades, Vic and Natly’s commentaries have amused, and often provoked. Matthews has said that he holds high standards for New Orleans, where he believes most people are too accepting and forgiving. His outspoken style often prompts controversy, yet he remains unapologetic. He believes that lines are meant to be crossed and through his work, he aims to educate and enlighten his audience, forcing them to react, to think and to change. Read More

Vernon Fisher

Distant Voices in a Foreign Language is Vernon Fisher’s first exhibition with the gallery and features multiple bodies of work from the past decade. Patricia Mora describes the artist’s work as “rigorous, yet thoroughly fun-infused, excursions that are analogous to solving for ‘x.’” Read More

Amy Feldman

Amy Feldman creates seemingly simple, large-scale gray abstractions notable for their visual impact and droll sense of humor. She explores how images and signs are perceived and distilled, and then draws attention to humanness in her work through its iconic language and subtle variation. Read More

John Hartman

City Portraits – New Orleans presents paintings of aerial views of the city and the surrounding parishes. The small- to large-scale works on panel and linen reflect the artist’s unique and vibrant color palette, and reveal his enduring esteem for the city and her contours. Unique to this new body of work is the addition of incorporated portraits of revered local musicians. Read More

Jacqueline Bishop

This exhibition includes small- to large-scale oil paintings on panel and linen, as well as medium-scale collages with watercolor on paper which reveal the artist's continued exploration of landscape painting and the complex connections between climate change, species extinction and migration. Read More

David Leventi

In his second exhibition with the gallery, photographer David Leventi presents his images of the interiors of world-famous opera houses juxtaposed with images of the interiors of the last remaining domed prisons. Together, they are a study in contrasts – the lavish social theaters versus stark dwellings of incarceration and deprivation. Astonishingly, the architectural similarities between the two venues momentarily obscure fundamental differences in their operations. One such difference is that of observation – the audience of many observing a few versus the few observing the many. The large-scale, painting-like prints allow the viewer the experience and emotion of being surrounded by the various spaces. The artist employs large-format Arca-Swiss cameras to ensure that his compositions are architecturally symmetrical and emphasize Euclidean geometry. Read More

Gordon Parks

Muhammad Ali was one of the most photographed figures of the 20th century. Well known are the images of the braggart, the charmer, the ferocious fighter, however this exhibition of nine medium-scale photographs by Gordon Parks captures a softer side of the boxer – relaxed and introspective – further revealing Parks’ ability to connect with the people he photographed and the implicit trust between subject and photographer. Read More