Exhibitions

John Hartman

City Portraits – New Orleans presents paintings of aerial views of the city and the surrounding parishes. The small- to large-scale works on panel and linen reflect the artist’s unique and vibrant color palette, and reveal his enduring esteem for the city and her contours. Unique to this new body of work is the addition of incorporated portraits of revered local musicians. Read More

Jacqueline Bishop

This exhibition includes small- to large-scale oil paintings on panel and linen, as well as medium-scale collages with watercolor on paper which reveal the artist's continued exploration of landscape painting and the complex connections between climate change, species extinction and migration. Read More

David Leventi

In his second exhibition with the gallery, photographer David Leventi presents his images of the interiors of world-famous opera houses juxtaposed with images of the interiors of the last remaining domed prisons. Together, they are a study in contrasts – the lavish social theaters versus stark dwellings of incarceration and deprivation. Astonishingly, the architectural similarities between the two venues momentarily obscure fundamental differences in their operations. One such difference is that of observation – the audience of many observing a few versus the few observing the many. The large-scale, painting-like prints allow the viewer the experience and emotion of being surrounded by the various spaces. The artist employs large-format Arca-Swiss cameras to ensure that his compositions are architecturally symmetrical and emphasize Euclidean geometry. Read More

Gordon Parks

Muhammad Ali was one of the most photographed figures of the 20th century. Well known are the images of the braggart, the charmer, the ferocious fighter, however this exhibition of nine medium-scale photographs by Gordon Parks captures a softer side of the boxer – relaxed and introspective – further revealing Parks’ ability to connect with the people he photographed and the implicit trust between subject and photographer. Read More

Bruce Davenport, Jr.

The four large-scale works in this exhibition are tributes to renowned heavyweight boxer champion Muhammad Ali. Each vivid color marker drawing, rendered in the artist’s celebrated style, is a variation of a common composition – an aerial view of a boxing match. Bordering this narrative are snapshots of Ali in action, along with memorable quotes such as, “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee." Customary in Davenport, Jr.’s works are the scrawlings of his personal thoughts and observations – scattered throughout in pockets of quiet spaces. Read More

Amer Kobaslija

This exhibition features small- to large-scale painted representations of artist studios on Plexiglas and wooden panels. Among them are the artist’s own studio, those of friends, as well as those of famous artists Balthus and Jackson Pollock. Read More

Erwin Redl

Random Precision in the Metric of Time presents a new body of work that reveals unexpected variances through time-based media and processes. Manifestations of rhythmic arrangements are explored using various media, either through movement or layers of materials accumulated over time. Read More

Luis Cruz Azaceta

PAINTING OUT LOUD is Luis Cruz Azaceta’s eighth exhibition with the gallery. The featured recent medium- and large-scale paintings and works on paper reflect the artist’s distinctive bright-colored abstraction and figuration and continue to encourage a dialogue regarding the current political climate, social injustices, war and ecocide. Read More

Deborah Kass

This exhibition of neon works and large-scale paintings on canvas is Deborah Kass’ second with the gallery. Drawing from contemporary society, Broadway musicals, Yiddish and prominent art figures, she continues to incorporate lyrics and vernacular, melding art history and pop culture in vibrant, resonating compositions reminiscent of Frank Stella and Ellsworth Kelly. The work is depictive of the current posture of popular and political culture and the ensuing dysphoria, especially in contrast to the optimism of the postwar era. Read More

Gordon Parks

“Segregation Story” includes never-before-published images originally part of a series photographed for a 1956 Life magazine photo-essay assignment, “The Restraints: Open and Hidden,” which documented everyday lives of an extended black family living in the rural South under Jim Crow segregation. This compelling series challenged the myth of racism, demonstrating that the ambitions, responsibilities and routines of this family were no different than those of white Americans. All photographs © The Gordon Parks Foundation. Read More