Press & Media

Arthur Roger Gallery at Art Miami 2015

The Arthur Roger Gallery is very pleased to be a part of Art Miami this year. At Booth C36, we are exhibiting works by Richard Baker, David Bates, Willie Birch, Douglas Bourgeois, Robert Colescott, Stephen Paul Day, Dawn DeDeaux, Lesley Dill, James Drake, Lin Emery, David Leventi, Whitfield Lovell, Stephanie Patton, Erwin Redl and Holton Rower. The exhibition will be on view from December 2 – December 6, 2014 at the Miami Art Pavilion located in the Miami Midtown Arts District. Read More

“Oikos and Poesis: Art and Our Planetary Future,” The Brooklyn Rail

Thoreau famously proclaimed that, “in wildness is the preservation of the world.” And, as Gary Snyder explains, the poetic mind, the mind of the creative artist, is a realm of wildness. Thus, the eco-syllogism: preservation of the world depends on the wild. The poetic mind is wild. Therefore, the preservation of the world depends on the poetic mind. Read More

Lin Emery at the Center of a Scholarly Revolution

Space Machines Corporation, a small New Orleans consultancy in the field of kinetic sculpture and motion display system design, has today announced the publication of a scholarly essay which brings to an international audience a revolutionary approach to modern art history inspired in great part by the work of our own Lin Emery. Read More

“On and around Julia Street, it’s Art for Art’s Sake,” The Advocate

Arthur Roger will be presenting a show of shimmering, natural form-based kinetic sculptures by veteran New Orleans-based artist Lin Emery, along with David Leventi’s grand photos of opera houses and prisons and river- and cityscapes by Simon Gunning. And one of the newest additions to the Julia Street scene, Julie Silvers Art, will be celebrating its grand opening Saturday with a DJ, door prizes, and other “surprises” from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Read More

“Birch/Davenport/Parks,” New Orleans Art Review

IT’S DIFFICULT TO place exhibits in New Orleans at this time of this year outside of the context of The Storm. The subject looms like heavy billowing clouds, densely gray and thickly churning, an extended horizontal weight floating and staying just above our heads. Many of us are walking with eyes cast down, or otherwise away from the reminders of ten years gone. At New Orleans Museum of Art, it is an apt title for an exhibit comprised of work not necessarily about Katrina. At Arthur Roger Gallery, the concept also appears to be at the heart of three exhibitions. Read More