Press & Media

“Jim Richard: Domestic Bliss,” New Orleans Art Review

IMPLICIT IN RICHARD’S painting is a revived perception of the decorative function of art. His pictures declare the power of decoration to concentrate sensuous experience and, thus, to grip the viewer. With a system of rhythms and carefully sited disjunctions — and, of course, his piquant sense of color, Richard makes delight unavoidable. Read More

“CHERYL DONEGAN,” New Orleans Art Review

Schorr reads Donegan’s act as “simulation of total abandon” in order to question “who owns women’s pleasure—whether it’s made by men, or by a woman’s own body.” In a 1997 interview, Donegan discussed her own intentions: “firstly, to make a video that used sex in a style antithetical to the MTV jump cut” by using duration and fulfillment to reclaim “female agency.” Read More

“Of Narrative & the Surreal,” New Orleans Art Review

At Arthur Roger, two artists — James Drake and Vernon Fisher — approach them with collages of imagery, delving into personal history to make non-linear, and at times autobiographical, narratives. In the video space at Arthur Roger, Lee Deigaard’s photographs show the viewer the unseen landscape – darkened by night and populated with feral creatures.All the artists tap into a subconscious automatism and surreal intent in some form or another, embracing their themes through play, form, and concept. Read More

George Dureau, The Photographs

George Dureau, The Photographs is an album of the great photographic portraits made throughout the forty years of Dureau’s artistic career—a New Orleans romance between the photographer and his subjects. Read More

“Exhibition Pick: Jim Richard and Friends,” Pelican Bomb

Jim Richard’s ninth exhibition at Arthur Roger Gallery brings together four of his former students—Cheryl Donegan, Amy Feldman, Wayne Gonzales, and Lisa Sanditz—to share the gallery space with him. It has the collegial feeling of a school group project, with the artists putting in their own individual contributions, but this is one where the teacher joins in too. Read More

“Granite Landscape,” art Vail Valley Gallery Guide

The legacy of world-renowned sculptor Jesús Moroles lives on in Vail following his untimely death in a car accident earlier this year. Moroles’ “Granite Landscape” in Vail’s Ford Park has become a favorite in the town’s public art collection. The installation has served as an intimate gathering place for Bravo! Pre-concert talks, Vail Performing Arts Academy performances, yoga classes and even weddings. The public has embraced and become stewards of the art, which was something dear to the artist. Read More

“Review: Darn That Dream at Arthur Roger Gallery,” Gambit

For most of his career, Jim Richard’s paintings amounted to “art about art,” only instead of art history, they suggested settings for short stories where the artworks themselves were the protagonists. These new works are similar but they also allude to the way digital technology now makes everything in the world seem more accessible yet somehow less real, as elusive as pixels on a computer screen. Read More

“5 Artists to Watch: Cuba Edition,” artnet News

Red is certainly not the only color Cubans express themselves with, however—a country with a famously colorful personality, Cuba embodies a wide-ranging palette in its lively architecture, people, cuisine, and vegetation. The artist Luis Cruz Azacata captures this vibrancy in his swirling, playful work, Swimming to Havana VIII. It’s easy to imagine the rainbow-streaked streets of Havana when looking at this artist’s oeuvre, so let this painting be a reminder for you to not miss out on the colorful experiences now available to you in Cuba. Read More