Francis X. Pavy

In "Third Coast Suite", Francis Pavy continues to build upon the imagery, concepts and ideas pertaining to the Louisiana coastal wetlands and surrounding waters. In the same vein as southern storytelling, Pavy constructs bold, colorful layers of iconic images reflecting local folklore. Read More

Dale Chihuly

This exhibition, Chihuly’s ninth with the gallery, includes new architectural installations and setworks representing the breadth and scope of the artist’s vision over the last four decades. Read More

Edward Whiteman

The Swinging Pendulum, Edward Whiteman’s twelfth solo exhibition with the gallery, features his renowned large-scale paintings created with mixed media on reconstructed paper. The wall pieces range in size from 4 to 10 feet and include familiar motifs – simple yet powerful linear forms with seductive color inspired by the environment. The artist’s paintings are unequivocally abstract but filled with possible allusions such as in The Nile, a work from the artist’s recent Egypt Series. These works feature subtler lines and more intricate patterns in earthen colors. Read More

Holton Rower

This second exhibition with New York-based artist Holton Rower includes his remarkable “Pour Paintings” along with a unique body of work titled “Focus paintings.” Holton Rower, who has been referred to as a “chemist and sculptor of paint,” is renowned for the incredible color combinations he achieves which can be stunningly psychedelic and hypnotic. Read More

Kate Blacklock

Kate Blacklock’s medium-scale works on metal present choreographed tableaus reminiscent of Dutch Vanitas paintings in one series and nightscapes, recalling Japanese screen paintings, in the other. The compositions, which are created using a flatbed scanner as a camera, are captured on dye infused aluminum. They are described by the artist as existing in an ambiguous space, not subject to the laws of gravity. Each of the works conjures an enigmatic moment frozen in time. Read More

Pard Morrison

Pard Morrison, inspired by Donald Judd’s rectilinear, minimalist sculptures and Agnes Martin’s ethereal, though also minimalist, grid paintings, continues to explore the nature of truth and perception with his work. He believes that the current anthropomorphisation of technological devices is rapidly causing the replacement of real experience by artificial two-dimensional experience. He strives to create work that, “upon first encounter primarily reads as artificially fabricated, but upon further investigation, the visual strength of its own "objectness" is compromised by specific human mark making.” Read More

Edward Burtynsky

Water is a series of large-scale aerial photographs by world-renowned Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky. The images, often equivocally abstract, portray humankind’s relationship with water and the dramatic effects of industrialization and the consequences of our interference. Burtynsky has traveled the world over the past five years documenting waterfronts, farmlands, irrigation plots, rivers and various water maintenance systems resulting in aesthetically powerful imagery that is at once striking and unnerving. Burtynsky, who strives to find an equal balance between form and content, hopes that the imagery in his work challenges the viewer and initiates a thought process that will eventually lead to a more conscientious view of the importance of this natural and rapidly diminishing resource. Read More

Gene Koss

Gene Koss blends simple process with advanced fabrication techniques to create glass sculptures that reveal the constant inspiration provided by the rural landscapes of his youth and life. The internationally known artist’s vision remains profoundly humanist, yet this recent work presents an intentional rawness. Several of the works in this exhibition incorporate found object pieces that have been woven in with the artist’s own dialogue. The work ranges in scale from large cast glass and steel sculptures to smaller blocks dubbed “glass drawings.” Read More

Willie Birch

Willie Birch is a storyteller, compelled to document the world in which he lives. With Southern Gothic: An Insider’s View, he presents the natural world around us, inviting the viewer to observe and interpret the apparent patterns and symbology found in our surroundings. Devoid of the human figure often found in the artist’s work, these large-scale paintings on paper and bronzes explore a deliberate yet improvisational landscape. Read More

Stephen Paul Day

Stephen Paul Day has chosen to be both creator and curator for Blame It On Vegas – Collecting Meta-Modern, his seventh exhibition with the gallery. Sculpture, neon and paintings make up this collection of new, engaging works that oscillate between humor and horror, history and the present and also between the artist’s vocabulary – color, form, and significance of materials – and his viewpoint – how one engages the viewer to make sense of the vision he is presenting. Grouped together as they would be in a museum, there is an intentional ambiguity as to who made each work. Day describes himself as a “Disney kind of collector, putting together a ‘wunderkammer’ of excellent art, artifacts, and story.” Read More