Gallery News

Luis Cruz Azaceta: No Exit

Luis Cruz Azaceta: No Exit is the first substantial overview of the work of the Cuban-American artist Luis Cruz Azaceta (born 1942). Azaceta’s childhood memories in Cuba (where he remained until he was 18 years old) mix with his first professional experiences in New York City (where he studied at the School of Visual Arts and where he lived for three decades) and those of his period of professional maturity in New Orleans. Read More

Dawn DeDeaux at MASS MoCA in May 2017

Thumbs up for the Mothership features individual works as well as a collaborative installation by New Orleans conceptual artist Dawn DeDeaux and Alabamian self-taught sculptor and musician Lonnie Holley. Deeply influenced by their southern roots, both artists mine the landscapes around them for found objects (a nod to Rauschenberg’s “combines”) and engage in dialogues around issues of ecology and social justice. Read More

The River and the Painter: Simon Gunning, New Orleans, the Mississippi River and its Bayous

The River and the Painter: Simon Gunning, New Orleans, the Mississippi River and its Bayous includes over 90 full-color plates of artist Simon Gunning’s paintings and sketches and includes an introductory essay and interview with the artist by author John M. Barry. This book is the very first survey of Gunning’s work and depicts his three collections of paintings: The River, The City, and The Bayous and Swamps. Read More

Arthur Roger Gallery at Art Miami 2016

The Arthur Roger Gallery is very pleased to be a part of Art Miami this year. At Booth B100, we are exhibiting works by John Alexander, Luis Cruz Azaceta, David Bates, Jacqueline Bishop, Douglas Bourgeois, Robert Colescott, Stephen Paul Day, Lesley Dill, James Drake, Troy Dugas, George Dureau, Lin Emery, Vernon Fisher, Tim Hailand, Whitfield Lovell, Deborah Luster, Gordon Parks, Holton Rower, and Amy Weiskopf. Read More

“Forget the Coasts. Look to the Hinterlands,” The New York Times

Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art questions and explores the complex and contested space of the American South. One needs to look no further than literature, cuisine and music to see evidence of the South’s profound influence on American culture, and consequently much of the world. Read More

“Review: works from the Deep South by Simon Gunning and Maude Schuyler Clay,” Gambit

“Simon Gunning and the Southern Louisiana Landscape” at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. October 1, 2016 – February 5, 2017. “Did you ever stand and shiver … just because you were looking at a river?” So sang Bob Dylan’s early mentor, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, about a youthful trip to New Orleans where the Mississippi River’s inscrutable currents embodied the sense of mystery he felt here — a sensibility echoed by Simon Gunning in this sprawling retrospective. Intrigued by the Big Muddy and its contrast with the pristine shores of his native Australia, Gunning devoted much of his life to exploring its awesome charisma and the city it shaped. Read More

“Cut from the Same Cloth: Tim Hailand at Arthur Roger Gallery,” Pelican Bomb

The term Toile de Jouy refers to a particular style of patterned textile, typically a neutral background overlaid with woodcut-style bucolic scenes of Rococo romance. Think of men and women lounging in billowed, ruffled sleeves, children playing in pantaloons, a musician playing the flute, or a farm animal at work. Roughly translated, Toile de Jouy means “canvas of joy.” Considering these designs were often made into upholstery or wallpaper, the average contemporary viewer may be hard-pressed to feel joy; to be thrilled by a seat cushion or a parlor wall would be a rare ecstasy. However, artist Tim Hailand seems to be after something more complex than simple joy in his exhibition “Sister I’m a Poet,” currently on view at Arthur Roger Gallery. Read More