Gallery News

“George Dureau, New Orleans master painter and photographer, has died,” The Times-Picayune

Ogden Summer Family Fair at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art Saturday August 23, 2008. Artist George Dureau. (Photo by Steven Forster, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune archive)

Artist George Dureau, master of mythic painting and hyper-realistic photography died Monday morning (April 7) at the Waldon Health Care Center in Kenner, where he was being treated for advanced Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83. Read More

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“Review: The People of New Orleans from A to Z,” Gambit

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In 1920s Germany, a photographer named August Sander did a very German thing: He published a catalog of the German people. Like a field guide to birds, its subjects ranged from bankers to beggars, posed in their work clothes. Although initially well received, it was banned when Adolf Hitler came to power because Sanders’ people didn’t look like his idea of a “master race.” Fortunately, no one ever mistook New Orleanians for a master race, so Bunny Matthews’ drawings, The People of New Orleans From A to Z, are available for all to see. Rendered in his traditional post-psychedelic baroque caricature style, Astrologer captures the zoned-out gaze of a bejeweled lady in a turban as she peers into the wonders and terrors of the future. The Drunk, by contrast, sees little beyond his martini, but The Fisherman, depicted with the oil rig-studded waters of the Gulf behind him, clutches a redfish as proudly as the father of a newborn babe who worries about the future. Read More

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Lin Emery: In Motion at New Orleans Museum of Art

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View Lin Emery’s work in motion from her exhibition Lin Emery: In Motion at the New Orleans Museum of Art Read More

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“Art review: Dual David Bates exhibits show different sides of the artist,” Dallas News

This painted bronze titled, "Man in Red Chair", 1994, is on display at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. The Modern and the Nasher Sculpture Center, present a joint exhibition of the work of artist David Bates, of Dallas, on view February 9 through May 11, 2014. The exhibition is a retrospective of Bates's work installed in both locations with an emphasis on painting in Fort Worth and sculpture and works on paper in Dallas. This is the first collaboration between the two museums. Shot on Wednesday, February 12, 2014. David Woo/Staff Photographer

David Bates is without question Dallas’ most venerated artist and, at 61, definitely worthy of a serious museum reappraisal. Artists often have mixed feelings about such things, since so many significant retrospectives have the aura of museum funerals rather than progress reports. So, it was with a bit of trepidation that David Bates, whose work has found its way into important collections from New York to Hawaii, said OK to a two-museum retrospective of his career at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. Read More

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David Bates at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

David Bates, Self Portrait

February 9 – May 11, 2014: In a career spanning more than forty years, Bates has combined exquisite technique with a deep understanding of American modernist traditions, resulting in a body of work that is at once sophisticated, soulful, and accessible. From his lush early paintings of the Arkansas nature conservancy Grassy Lake and the Texas Gulf Coast; to his reliefs, sculptures, and assemblages created in a variety of materials; to his most recent paintings depicting survivors of Hurricane Katrina, self-portraits, and a return to still life, this exhibition provides an in-depth look at the work of a unique and significant American artist. This exhibition includes approximately 45 paintings on view in Fort Worth, and 45 sculptures and 20 related paintings and drawings on view in Dallas. Read More

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David Bates at the Nasher Sculpture Center

David Bates, Zydeco Man, c. 1999, wood, paint, and wire, 37 1/2 x 21 1/2 x 18 inches

February 9 – May 11, 2014: In a career spanning more than 40 years, Bates has combined exquisite technique with a deep understanding of American modernist traditions, resulting in a body of work that is at once sophisticated, soulful, and accessible. From his lush early paintings of the Arkansas nature conservancy Grassy Lake and the Texas Gulf Coast, to his reliefs, sculptures, and assemblages created in a variety of materials, to his most recent paintings depicting survivors of Hurricane Katrina, selfportraits and a return to still life, this exhibition provides an in-depth look at the work of a unique and significant American artist. This exhibition includes approximately 45 paintings on view in Fort Worth, and 45 sculptures and 20 related paintings and drawings on view in Dallas. Read More

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“The Most Successful Dallas Artist Ever,” D Magazine

DALLAS MAVERICK: Self Portrait, Winter, 2009 PHOTOGRAPHER Kevin Todora, courtesy Talley Dunn Gallery

David Bates bounces around a storage room crammed with his art at Talley Dunn Gallery. He’s a bit frazzled, for good reason. It’s November, and he has less than three months to prepare for one of the biggest exhibitions of his life, a retrospective that will be mounted simultaneously at the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Read More

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“Aquaflora,” featuring Allison Stewart at the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art

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An exhibition consisting of the work of six 21st cenutry artists whose work represents a landscape of layered shadows, water, petals, limbs, vines, floating leaves, and biomorphic shapes that can all be found in nature. The colorful abstracts were created by artists Judy Pfaff and Jasmina Danowski, New York, Carlyle Wolfe, Oxford MS, Suzanna Fields, Virginia, Bassmi Ibrahim, Florida, and Allison Stewart, New Orleans. Read More

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“Stephanie Patton: Level at the McNay Museum,” McNay Art Museum

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Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Stephanie Patton’s art crosses the realms of photography, sculpture, painting, installation, performance, video, audio, and text. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and a Master of Fine Arts in photography from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She also studied vocal and comedic performance through the New School, Upright Citizens Brigade, and Gotham Writers’ Workshop, all in New York. Her work is often humorous in nature and frequently investigates aspects of human emotion. Read More

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“Gene Koss’s New Work,” New Orleans Art Review

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LIKEABLE. GENE KOSS’S work is likeable. And I like looking at his work. Seeing how earlier themes continue to evolve, what new variations on the theme of, for example, Disc Drawings, have been developed, what new huge piece has taken form, and what new ideas have been added too the artist’s repertoire, as some idea are revisited and renewed, while others are new. This new exhibition at the Arthur Roger Gallery is no exception. Especially interesting is to see the new large work that the artist has conceived, Line Fence in this exhibit. Working with cast glass as his primary medium, which he often combines with various and sundry other materials and found objects, Koss’s work challenges whatever reservations one may have, with respect to a medium conventionally associated with utilitarian objects, about the viability of glass as a material for conceptual art. Combine Koss’s wit, expressed in titles evoking amusing associations that offer multiple paths for approaching the work, with the artist’s use of glass in ways unexpected by those unacquainted with its potential, and the confident craftsmanship of the mature artist produces work that represents a confluence of formal strength, humorous associations, and syntheses of multiple historical antecedents. Read More

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