Exhibitions

James Drake

Can We Know the Sound of Forgiveness, artist James Drake’s eleventh exhibition with the gallery, features a collection of the artist’s “red” drawings as well as a grouping of glass sculpture. The pastel drawings continue to reveal the renowned artist’s method and deliberation. The subjects, always personal, are often flecked with faint notations and markings, on paper consumed by the process, sometimes pieced together with exposed tape. Read More

Holton Rower

This second exhibition with New York-based artist Holton Rower includes his remarkable “Pour Paintings” along with a unique body of work titled “Focus paintings.” Holton Rower, who has been referred to as a “chemist and sculptor of paint,” is renowned for the incredible color combinations he achieves which can be stunningly psychedelic and hypnotic. Read More

Lin Emery at NOMA

To celebrate Lin Emery’s artistic accomplishments and contributions to the community, NOMA is highlighting a selection of her recent pedestal and kinetic sculptures in the second floor Lupin Gallery. Read More

Pard Morrison

Pard Morrison, inspired by Donald Judd’s rectilinear, minimalist sculptures and Agnes Martin’s ethereal, though also minimalist, grid paintings, continues to explore the nature of truth and perception with his work. He believes that the current anthropomorphisation of technological devices is rapidly causing the replacement of real experience by artificial two-dimensional experience. He strives to create work that, “upon first encounter primarily reads as artificially fabricated, but upon further investigation, the visual strength of its own "objectness" is compromised by specific human mark making.” Read More

David Halliday

David Halliday’s photographic series, Threadbare, profoundly builds on his previous work, at once announcing the photographer’s maturity as an artist. Provocative iconography of lost Americana - heavily decayed objects whose original intention has been exhausted - is given a new sort of vitality as his subject matter. Read More

Kate Blacklock

Kate Blacklock’s medium-scale works on metal present choreographed tableaus reminiscent of Dutch Vanitas paintings in one series and nightscapes, recalling Japanese screen paintings, in the other. The compositions, which are created using a flatbed scanner as a camera, are captured on dye infused aluminum. They are described by the artist as existing in an ambiguous space, not subject to the laws of gravity. Each of the works conjures an enigmatic moment frozen in time. Read More

Various Artists

Arthur Roger Gallery is very pleased to be a part of Art Miami this year. At Booth C1, we are exhibiting works by Luis Cruz Azaceta, Richard Baker, David Bates, Jacqueline Bishop, Douglas Bourgeois, Stephen Paul Day, Lesley Dill, James Drake, Troy Dugas, George Dureau, Courtney Egan, Lin Emery, Deborah Luster, Francis X. Pavy, Holton Rower and John Waters. The exhibition will be on view from December 3 - December 8, 2013 at the Miami Art Pavilion located in the Miami Midtown Arts District. Read More

John Hartman

John Hartman, one of Canada’s most renowned contemporary painters, conceives of cities not as man-made anomalies but rather as provocative landscapes. With a unique and vibrant color palette, astral-like perspective and obvious deference, he captures the essence and lifeblood of the chosen terrain. New Orleans From Above presents aerial views of the city and surrounding areas through the artist’s distinct voice. The compositions include New Orleans from above Algiers, the CBD and Mississippi; as well as Bayou Lafourche, Delacroix, Port Fourchon, Yscloskey and Shell Beach. The exhibition is comprised of large- and small-scale oil paintings on linen and birch panel, as well as watercolor on paper. Read More

Courtney Egan

Courtney Egan’s projection-based sculptural installations meld nature with technology, delivering an experience that is both pleasing and disconcerting. The ethereal projections – converging on walls, floors and sculptural elements – are inspired by the growing frequency of human exposure to nature via computers or television. Egan creates stunning yet “subtly impossible, hybrid tableaus” which envelope the viewer in a conversation between memory of the natural world and a new experience with a plant or flower. She explains the fundamental irony of the experience, stating, “We get closer and farther away from the natural world simultaneously when we experience it through a technological lens.” Read More