Exhibitions

Rob Wynne

Rob Wynne’s debut exhibition with the gallery features recent poured mirrored glass texts and sculpted glass compositions, as well as earlier framed, embroidered canvases. The artist has a long-standing fascination with narrative. Utilizing words that resonate – overheard phrases and poetic quotations – he creates works that give a landscape to language. Read More

John Pilson

Altogether Elsewhere brings together three projects which taken together represent the artist's long term interest in blurred distinctions between social documentary, experimental narrative and the many ways in which visual art and spontaneous performance are woven in to daily experience. Read More

Holton Rower

The paintings in Holton Rower's "Love Heals" compose an amazingly vibrant exhibition of works with incredible color combinations that can be stunningly psychedelic and completely hypnotic. The artist creates the paintings with a simple yet incredibly beautiful process that is carried out with variations in technique that produce wildly different effects. Read More

Jesús Moroles

Jesús Moroles considers granite “the core and heart of the universe.” His new sculptures exemplify his recognizable and revered technique, presented in small- to large-scale and utilizing a range of granite including Texas Pink, Dakota, Black and Fredericksburg. The abstract works continue to resound with suggestions of nature and man and explore the coexistence of the two. Trained formally in the United States and having spent a year in the quarries in Pietrasanta, Italy, Moroles is recognized internationally as one of the greatest sculptors working with granite today. Read More

Ersy

Ersy is revered for her work rooted in precise craftsmanship of materials including bronze, silver and wood. Scale, perspective and presentation play critical roles. The desired effect is that the viewer’s own size and relation to the piece become questioned. She recently received high critical praise for her 40-year retrospective at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, “Ersy: Architect of Dreams.” Her exhibition at the Arthur Roger Gallery is based on work included in the retrospective. Read More

David Sullivan

David Sullivan’s animated paintings collapse the macrocosm into the microcosm. They are a collision of the gestural brushstrokes of abstract painting with the realism of 3D computer graphics. In the animations, humidity melts reified objects into states of transition. Refineries become atoms become organs become tumors. Like some will-o-the-wisp along the Mississippi River, seen dimly through the heat, ambiguous objects drip in a slowly evolving lightshow. Chemical reactions, in time and space, of molecules and Spanish moss glow over petrochemical plants. The industrial plants, their emissions and affected organs dissolve into one. Read More

David Bates

The paintings in “Down Highway 23” are the result of a fishing trip in the late spring of 2010, the fateful year of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Instead of the planet’s finest redfish, David Bates was met with a poisoned landscape crawling with reporters, politicians and well-meaning volunteers. Through the hubbub, Bates observed the faces and posture of the local fishers and crabbers. Although wary, their looks also conveyed a resolution far from resignation. Read More

Joseph Havel

Joseph Havel’s sculptures exemplify the fluid condition between meanings, associations and the histories of common materials. Through reconfiguration of shape and material, everyday objects such as shirt labels, collars, flags and sheets present new impressions without erasing evidence of the originals. The intent of the artist “is for memory, an associative pentimento, to dissolve the resoluteness of the forms into something more poetic.” Read More

Keith Perelli

In “Mosquito Muerto" Keith Perelli seeks to expose our emotional defenses as a penetrable, raw façade of our psychological armor. The figures, painted as though from the inside out, have been rendered as stripped and dissected. They are woven into environments composed of tangles of flora, objects of antiquity and illusory abstraction. Read More

Mary Jane Parker

"Keepsakes" was inspired by the masses of foliage that blanketed the New Orleans landscape in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Struck by the natural patterns of vines and how they decorated the surfaces of the city, Mary Jane Parker began photographing, drawing and cutting stencils of them. This current body of work is a lush, yet slightly uneasy collision of patterns, mementos, nature and the disquiet of suppressed memories. Read More