Exhibitions

Troy Dugas

The intricate, large-scale cut paper assemblages in The Shape of Relics are created from unused product labels that artist Troy Dugas collects. The shredded or cut source material is meticulously arranged to create mesmerizing compositions that appear woven. The purpose of the original label is obscured through the use of repetition, pattern, symmetry, precision and scale. New meaning is created by the reinterpretation of color, shape and line. Read More

Allison Stewart

With Natural Wonders, Allison Stewart continues a body of work that occupies the space between landscape and organic abstractions. Materials and process are significant and inform the imagery in this exhibition of mixed media work on canvas and paper. The artist works with various materials which attract and repel – such as acrylic, enamel, inks, tar, charcoal, metallic powders and wax. Forms appear and dissolve under layers of paint until they finally coalesce into an image that may be both familiar and unknowable. Read More

Jacqueline Bishop

In this new body of work, Against the Tide, Jacqueline Bishop continues to convey the complexity and fragility of our ecosystem and the psychological connections between species. She describes the new paintings as, “a shift from being inside an unraveling ‘nest world’ to the outside – viewing the planet from a distance, literally presenting the earth as object.” She explores how our natural world is shaped and transformed by climate change, globalization and species extinction and invites us to reflect on the impact to our collective future. Read More

John Alexander

John Alexander has been described as painting “nature at its grandest and man at his worst.” This exhibition of new paintings and works on paper embodies his continued passion for wildlife, flora and fauna, and the detail found within. Read More

Holton Rower

The paintings in Holton Rower's "Love Heals" compose an amazingly vibrant exhibition of works with incredible color combinations that can be stunningly psychedelic and completely hypnotic. The artist creates the paintings with a simple yet incredibly beautiful process that is carried out with variations in technique that produce wildly different effects. Read More

John Pilson

Altogether Elsewhere brings together three projects which taken together represent the artist's long term interest in blurred distinctions between social documentary, experimental narrative and the many ways in which visual art and spontaneous performance are woven in to daily experience. Read More

Jesús Moroles

Jesús Moroles considers granite “the core and heart of the universe.” His new sculptures exemplify his recognizable and revered technique, presented in small- to large-scale and utilizing a range of granite including Texas Pink, Dakota, Black and Fredericksburg. The abstract works continue to resound with suggestions of nature and man and explore the coexistence of the two. Trained formally in the United States and having spent a year in the quarries in Pietrasanta, Italy, Moroles is recognized internationally as one of the greatest sculptors working with granite today. Read More

David Bates

The paintings in “Down Highway 23” are the result of a fishing trip in the late spring of 2010, the fateful year of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Instead of the planet’s finest redfish, David Bates was met with a poisoned landscape crawling with reporters, politicians and well-meaning volunteers. Through the hubbub, Bates observed the faces and posture of the local fishers and crabbers. Although wary, their looks also conveyed a resolution far from resignation. Read More

Francis X. Pavy

Francis Pavy is a visual narrator of South Louisiana’s vibrant culture. The selected works in “200: Art Inspired by 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood” are not historical representations; rather, they are all new pieces inspired by events, people and themes that have figured in the history of Louisiana. Read More

Mary Jane Parker

"Keepsakes" was inspired by the masses of foliage that blanketed the New Orleans landscape in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Struck by the natural patterns of vines and how they decorated the surfaces of the city, Mary Jane Parker began photographing, drawing and cutting stencils of them. This current body of work is a lush, yet slightly uneasy collision of patterns, mementos, nature and the disquiet of suppressed memories. Read More